Demystifying the Australian bunch

I think we can all agree that there is a flower arrangement to suit any occasion. Roses for Valentine’s Day, daisies for a friendly “hello”, white lilies for condolences, the options are as limitless as there are flowers in this world. However, since noticing an Australian native bunch a few years back I have never looked at flowers in quite the same way.

I fell in love with flowers as a young girl picking what I know now to be weeds on the side of the footpath. The wildness against the daintiness fascinated me and since then I have always preferred arrangements with a bit of a freshly cut feel. The Australian native bunch is exactly that, unruly and beautiful.

An Australian native flower arrangement is typically composed of

  • Banksias
  • Proteas
  • Gum
  • Amaranth
  • Paper daisies
  • Statice
  • Emu grass

The key with any arrangement is to keep the lighter colours on the outside of the arrangement and keep the darker colours towards the centre. My focal point was the paper daisies but as you can see, the protea always stood out in the end. I played a bit with the rules but the basics are always the same.

These materials are hardy, long lasting and colourful. The aromatic gum transports you to the very heart of the Australian bush and the untamed nature of the native flora where able to shine in a free form arrangement. This is by far my favourite arrangement to practice with since it is also rich in texture.

When caring for this sort of arrangement, make sure to cut 3cm off the stem as soon as you get home. A clean vase, fresh water and placement in a cool area of the house will ensure it lasts for at least a week. One of the advantages of the Australian bunch is that as it dries, these flowers change colour but will still look beautiful as a dried arrangement. Make sure to always remove individual components as they wither and discard them.

Until then, happy flower arranging!

 

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